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Old 28-12-2008, 21:59
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Joe Forster/STA Joe Forster/STA is offline
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You're not escaping my communistic lesson this time either...

In today's society, the higher powers create artificial (unnatural, unrealistic) needs for the plebs so that their otherwise meaningless life - being born, growing up, working for decades, raising children and then dying - is given a meaning. Intelligent people have a true meaning for their life anyway, without anyone else needed to tell them thankyouverymuch, but the majority of mankind is not intelligent enough. With more and more people on the planet, this is especially true: born, genetic intelligence has to be nurtured to become real, effective intelligence, which means good food, good education, both of which several billion people don't get today. With the homeland/home continent having become saturated with their goods, multinational companies are now moving into the third world, seeking market, fooling uneducated people with their advertising and generating profit from selling products to people who actually don't need them. This is, however, also true in developed countries: it is called consumerism.

Property, rights and stealing are just a matter of definition, a social consensus. There's no need for property when there's an abundance of all the material that people need. If everyone can have a house, a car, lots of food, good health, good education and whatever else is considered to be useful in life - at least, at this moment - then there is no need to take away something from your neighbor when you also have it all already. Thus, stealing inherently loses its meaning. And, for that matter, so does money. But, as most people cannot imagine a world like this, science fiction writers had to do it for them.

Adam Wiśniewski-Snerg's novel "Robot" (1973) is a very good hard science fiction with philosophical overtones. (It, along with its author, is almost completely unknown so don't be surpised if you haven't heard about it.) At its end, [SPOILERS AHEAD!] it solves the mystery by describing that the city, in/under which the story unfolds, was ripped away from the surface of Earth and sealed into the hangar of an interstellar spaceship. The citizens are taken care of by automized factories which create an abundance of goods: cars, TV's etc., of course, all for free as the abductors neither know nor care about money and their technology is much more advanced than ours. The interesting part is that the citizens are unsatisfied exactly because of the abundance and have no idea how to make sensible use of it: they 1) throw away everything after little use and 2) are (fortunately, not literally) killing each other over small batches of non-standard products. [END OF SPOILERS] This is a sad parody of consumerism where success and good life are symbolised by individuals having as their own property physical objects that others don't have. However, the higher powers here also had their calculations correct: as long as people are busy with their daily routines and are satisfied with their life at some level, they won't notice/bother with the discrepancies, problems on higher levels.

Making pirates the culprits warps the facts to your own ideal of the truth at least as much as pirates do when they say they wouldn't have bought that software anyway. It's interesting what I read the other day on some forum: people report that their "warez collector" friends have tons of software that they have no use for. (Well, having productivity software around is never useless, as you or your friends may some time need it, but that's out of scope here.) Now, compare this to the hero of capitalism, the person that the plebs deifies: the successful businessman who makes money from either money (banker, broker) or by selling goods that someone else created (vendor, reseller), and has several houses on the beach, huge gardens with fountains and swimming pools, limousines with a chauffeur, busty babes around and everything that money can get. (See a few American-made movies and you'll see what I mean.) E.g. this businessman could go to work by bicycle, and also tick off the daily exercise by that, but 1) that's so plebs-like and 2) he has enough time and money to go to a fitness club anyway.

All this above proves my point: in today's society, most people want to have, at any cost, without morals or sense. It is primarily the system, governed by the higher powers, that is corrupt and the need for survival, to counteract the consequences of how the system "works", makes small people corrupt, too, on many levels. Software piracy is just one symptom of this so be more broad-minded about it.

[...] In case someone didn't get it, a very simple example: creating illegal copies of a software is immoral - at least, some people in this era think so - but it is magnitudes more immoral to lie about non-existing weapons of mass destruction in Iraq - when it's actually about oil -, which cost estimatedly hundreds of thousands of lives - and the value of human life was supposed to be saint in all eras.
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Last edited by Joe Forster/STA; 29-12-2008 at 09:48.
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